Void Manufacturing

“Turning and turning in a cell, like a fly that doesn’t know where to die.”

Archive for January, 2010

I just wanted to remind everyone that safety is no accident

Posted by voidmanufacturing on January 30, 2010

This image was stolen from Chopper Dave’s blog, this is not safe, do not use your lathe like this.

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DAN WICKETT INTERVIEWS PERCIVAL EVERETT FROM THE EMMERGING WRITERS FORUM

Posted by voidmanufacturing on January 29, 2010

The following is an interview with Percival Everett, author of fifteen published books (2 short story collections, a novella, and 12 novels) as well as two more to come in the next twelve months (a short story collection and a novel).  He lives on a small farm just west of Los Angeles, with his wife Francessa, two step-children, and a bevy of animals.  He is currently a professor at the University of Southern California.

“I watch television.  Of course I also closely examine my dogs’ shit to make sure they don’t have worms.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Renzo Novatore

Posted by voidmanufacturing on January 12, 2010

MY BELIEFS

RENZO NOVATORE

(1920)

GOD: The creation of a sick fantasy. Inhabitant of senile and impotent brains. Companion and comforter of rancid spirits born to slavery. A pill for constipated minds. Marxism for the faint of heart. Read the rest of this entry »

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Primitive Green: An Interview with John Zerzan

Posted by voidmanufacturing on January 4, 2010

Primitive green

G Sampath

Sunday, December 20, 2009 1:00 IST

John Zerzan first shot into celebrity philosopher status in 1995 after the New York Times featured him in 1995 as a supporter of the Unabomber’s anti-technology doctrine. He has since become a leading light of the primitivist movement in the US. In an exclusive interview with DNA, he explains why modern civilization is fundamentally anti-human, ‘green’ technology is ‘psycho’ and Stone Age is the way to go.

American philosopher John Zerzan’s thesis is simple: civilization is pathological, and needs to be dismantled. Zerzan’s radical critique of civilization, laid out in books such as Elements Of Refusal (1988), Future Primitive (1994), and Running On Emptiness (2002) draws on anthropological research to argue that domestication of nature and domestication of humans go hand in hand. And this is accomplished primarily through technology. According to him, the dystopia of the Wachowski Brothers’ Matrix trilogy is already here: the technological-industrial ‘machine’ is already running the world, a world where individual humans are but insignificant little cogs with barely any autonomy. No single human being – neither the most powerful politician, nor the most powerful businessman – has the power to rein in the system. They necessarily have to follow the inexorable logic of what has been unleashed. He believes that the climate change summit in Copenhagen is a joke, and environmentalists are too superficial in their critiques to make a difference. In an exclusive interview, the California-based Zerzan, who was in Mumbai recently for a lecture tour, talks about why going back to the primitivism of the Stone Age is the only meaningful ‘green’ alternative.

Your work has been described as ‘anti-civilisational’. Are you seriously against civilisation? Of course. Anti-civilisational thought draws attention to the nightmare that’s unfolding right now. It asks some basic questions that haven’t been asked. It tries to change the subject away from the manoeuvring on the surface of dominant systems, in favour of going to the roots of it, and posing alternative directions, alternative projects, on a very basic level. I mean, here we are, as a species, and we can’t breathe the air. What more do you have to say? Read the rest of this entry »

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Interview with artist Al Columbia about his new book ‘Pim & Francie’

Posted by voidmanufacturing on January 3, 2010

Here is an interview with Al Columbia from ‘The Daily Cross Hatch’ http://thedailycrosshatch.com/

So, what really happened to Al Columbia? Simple, really—he created some comics, for Fantagraphics, did illustration work for the likes of The New York Times, collaborated on with folks like Archer Prewitt, recorded some music, and did design work on The Postal Service’s 2003 debut, Give Up. Oh, and he also recently launched a Website, just in case you’re have some trouble keeping track of all that.

Al Columbia has kept fairly busy for the past two decades, though many people seemingly have some difficulty accepting this fact, judging from the enigmatic air that seems to surround his works in the online community. Maybe it’s dark nature of much of his work—evidenced most recently by the strips that comprise his new book, Pim & Francie: The Golden Bear Days. Perhaps it’s the artist’s self-describe concentration problem, which has hampered his ambitions of creating longer works.

Columbia can’t say for sure how the notion initially arose, though he’s more than happy to discuss the subject—and nearly anything else, for that matter, including his music, meditation, and his thoughts on Top Shelf’s upcoming re-release of Eddie Campbell’s Alec stories.

Are you doing a lot of interviews, these days?

I did one, but not really. But I guess I’ll do them as they come. Not yet, anyway.

Are people not really asking, yet? Or are you choosy?

I think it’s more a case of your being only the second person to e-mail me. I guess it’s the early stages of it.

Do you think people might consider you difficult to approach about some things?

Possibly, yeah, because I don’t really get asked to do a lot of these. I never really have, either. Which I guess could either be a good or bad thing. I don’t really know. I’ve noticed that. I don’t really understand why, but I think people might have a difficulty approaching me, sure.

There was that whole long running thread on The Comics Journal message board—you seem to almost have this air of mystery about you, at least on Internet.

[Laughs] Yeah, sure. I’ve heard people say that. I’m not sure why. It’s a big mystery to me. Read the rest of this entry »

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